My Social Networking Usage: Gimme Personal Value

For a techie who’s totally into social web design, I have relatively few accounts on “social networking” sites. The main reason I have hesitated is covered by what Joshua Porter calls the Del.icio.us Lesson. In Josh’s words, the lesson is:

personal value precedes network value

I guess that’s why to this day I still haven’t signed up for a MySpace account. I simply have no idea what I would get out of it. I have accounts with a few social networking sites and I’ve noticed that how much I use them more or less directly correlates to what personal value they have to me.

Here are eight social networking sites I have accounts with. Six of them I use enough to have posted links to my profile in my blog footer.

Twitter

Twitter is probably the application on this list I use most for “social” purposes. For those that don’t know, Twitter is an application that is compatible with all sorts of interfaces (web, email, IM, SMS, RSS, etc.) that essentially lets you get status updates from your contacts. It has been described as “microblogging”, “public IM”, or “public away messages”.

I started using it at SXSW, mostly because Evan & Co. were the darlings of the event. But I quickly started to appreciate the value. Not only can you subscribe to friends, you can also subscribe to industry professionals you enjoy learning from. Their Twitter feeds often contain interesting nuggets of information they don’t publish on their blog. That’s the beauty of it. It’s short (140 characters or less) and quick. You can publish and consume quick thoughts without needing to sift through large blog posts.

The basic personal value I get from Twitter is the ability to post short thoughts of my own without having to dedicate an entire blog post. Beyond that, it lets me keep track of folks who are doing the same.

Flickr

Flickr is an easy one. The personal value is public sharing of photos. The networking effects allow me to always have the newest photos of my contacts delivered to my RSS feed. It is a simple, beautiful thing.

Last.fm

I’ve written about Last.fm in the past. Last.fm tracks my iTunes music listening habits and creates charts from them. For many people, this would not be enough personal value to make it worthwhile. But for me, it totally is. I love this. I eagerly await my charts every week. It’s like fantasy football for audiophiles.

I’ve actually dipped into the networking side of things, as I documented my befriending of my #1 Last.fm “neighbour” (person in the system with listening habits most similar to yourself). I swear, Last.fm must think I’m a Scot.

LinkedIn

Honestly, I’m almost surprised I use LinkedIn. I signed up when a friend wanted to link to me and then I actually started using it when Steve Ganz deployed all those hResumes. Now that Mario Sundar is with them, I’m intrigued.

It requires minimal effort to add contacts, and there are some personal benefits. It is nice to see what old colleagues are up to. In particular, I found out through LinkedIn’s home page that Kate Brigham had joined PatientsLikeMe. That alone was worth the minimal investment. Combing through others’ contacts to find old contacts is also a worthwhile task.

It seems that the possibilities for LinkedIn aren’t even being touched. I mean, right now it is essentially a hyperlinked address book. Things like the new Questions feature are promising. You would think it would have been more prominent in my job search a few months ago. Every once in a while, I see some UX positions listed from my “network”, but everything’s pretty much on the West coast.

That said, I get the feeling that LinkedIn is in it’s infancy and it is going to keep adding more useful functionality.

Del.icio.us

Ah, the site the Del.icio.us Lesson was named for. Tons of personal value here. I use a lot of different browsers and a couple computers. Saving links to Del.icio.us ensures I’ll have them on whatever machine or browser I happen to be on.

I rarely use the network value, but sometimes it can be interesting. For example, it allows you to see who saves your own posts so you can get a better idea about other sites that they find helpful.

YouTube

YouTube can have a HUGE personal benefit if you share a lot of your own videos. I’ve only posted a few, so I don’t utilize it quite that much. But I do also use my account to save excellent live performances (like this) that I want to make sure I can easily find later.

And now, here are the two sites not yet in my blog footer—meaning… I simply haven’t found a specific use for them.

Facebook

It’s all the rage. It seems to be all some people (Kawasaki, for example) can talk about right now. I’ve even signed up. Like, less than a month ago. And let me tell you what—I pretty much have no idea why I should use it. It really is just a collection of the same activities that I do elsewhere. I mean, as a blogger, do I need Facebook?

What is the only thing I’ve really done with Facebook? I’ve added a few apps to my profile. I’ve added the Twitter app, last.fm app, Flickr app (though I can’t get the damn thing to work right)… but I link to all of those profiles from my blog footer, too.

Facebook wants me to update my status. I already do that with Twitter. Worst part is that Facebook wants me to go to the site to update everything… and read everything. Sorry, no RSS. Sorry, but I really don’t go to websites anymore. (Also wish LinkedIn provided updates to your contacts via RSS, for the record.)

Facebook also feels anti-open, anti-standard, etc. For example, I have no idea how I would even link you to my profile. Could it really be “http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=544839151″? They can’t do any better than that? How about Facebook.com/adarowski? No? Why not?

As you can see, I’m underwhelmed. About all it is good for is the groups features (which I don’t even use because there is no RSS… so maybe it’s not all that good) and the last.fm widget rocks if I’m on a machine that doesn’t have my music or the last.fm app installed. As of now, I can only envision using it if it somehow crushes LinkedIn and becomes the #1 site for business networking.

Pownce

Pownce is a really cool technology that some compare to Twitter. As Brian points out, they should not. I simply haven’t been able to use it for anything because it seems that where it differs from Twitter is that it is great for small working groups. For example, if we didn’t use Skype at work, Pownce would be a great option. But we don’t, so I don’t use it.

I’m not saying it is bad. In fact, it is quite attractive and well done. I just don’t have a use for it yet. If it had beat Twitter to the streets, we’d all be using Pownce. But it didn’t, so it needs that extra use for people to adopt it.

So there you have it.

Those are the social networking apps I use. As you can see, I’m not much for the networking part, go figure. Gimme value immediately and you’ll suck me in.

6 Comments

  1. On August 16th, 2007 at 12:10 pm Nick Caler said:

    Adam, you actually gave the reason Facebook is so popular in your post. Its popular because everything is there, and more is being added through its platform api every day. Its a one stop look at the goings on on a person many differing sites. Where else can one see what your current music choices are and the pictures you’ve taken and find out what you are up to and see the people you know. On top of that by logging in you get a list of all the changes that your contacts have made. On top of that it limits random users from accessing your information (they need to be in the same network, and you can make your stuff more private should you desire). And it doesn’t look like complete crap, which is nice. It does indeed have some downfalls, and I agree that it seems like a closed system, but for the most part it appears like the best option for all-in-one profile out there(without spending time on your own personal blog site).

  2. On August 16th, 2007 at 12:18 pm Adam Darowski said:

    Where else can one see what your current music choices are and the pictures you’ve taken and find out what you are up to and see the people you know.

    I see your point, but when asking the question to me, you answered your own question…

    but for the most part it appears like the best option for all-in-one profile out there(without spending time on your own personal blog site).

    So, this seems to be the reason I don’t use it, but so many people do. Interesting.

  3. On August 16th, 2007 at 1:47 pm Nick Peters said:

    I think a lot of these apps are causing unnecessary clutter in our lives. For example, let’s take twitter; Does everyone really need to know what we’re doing? I found it really just becoming an outlet for writing down random thoughts in my head and having it become an unnecessary distraction. Myspace is the same way; Whenever I got a new email notification I got into the bad habit of interrupting whatever task it was to see what new message or friend add I got (most of it was spam anyways).
    There are some distractions that I can’t live without such as last.fm and Flickr and of course a social bookmarking site (most useful app ever!).
    I’ve noticed that people hop onto whatever hot 2.0 app is out there without really looking at the real value it may have in your life (just look at pownce :-P). Speaking of which, I found out you had to email them to delete your account.

  4. On August 16th, 2007 at 2:11 pm Adam Darowski said:

    I found it really just becoming an outlet for writing down random thoughts in my head and having it become an unnecessary distraction.

    I don’t actually use Twitter to answer the “What Are You Doing?” question. I basically use it as WordPress Lite. So, maybe it’s about finding your own use for these apps as well, sometimes.

    Myspace is the same way; Whenever I got a new email notification I got into the bad habit of interrupting whatever task it was to see what new message or friend add I got (most of it was spam anyways).

    Yet another place Twitter shines: With MySpace, Facebook, and Pownce, you have to go to the web site to read any notification. I don’t want to do that. With Twitter, I can tell it where I want my updates to go.

    (just look at pownce :-P). Speaking of which, I found out you had to email them to delete your account.

    In their defense, as a piece of beta software, they probably didn’t anticipate people wanting to jump ship before they officially launch. Not the most pressing feature, I’d guess.

  5. On August 16th, 2007 at 3:35 pm Mike Linegang said:

    It seems that the possibilities for LinkedIn aren’t even being touched.

    Definitely agree with that statement.

    LinkedIn seems to be following the ’90’s web model of amassing large usage numbers and then figuring out how to generate revenue later. There’s definitely opportunities for generating revenue off of the site in the future. Once you have a well-formed network, you could use it as:
    1) a communication tool for directing content (e.g. advertisements) to a target audience,
    2) identifying sources of knowledge and expertise (e.g. executive recruiting),
    3) obtaining personalized feedback about individuals in the network (e.g. background checks)

    All three of those examples seem like things somebody will want to pay for, and there’s probably lots more ideas like them that the LinkedIn folks will be pursuing soon.

  6. On February 27th, 2011 at 12:44 pm bölüm fragmanı said:

    thanks for me